Review - Thomson Roddick & Medcalf Sale
29th October 2002, Edinburgh.

Continued

Edinburgh
LotAchieved
264.Alex Edmonston, 1814 - a pair of sugar tongs, oar pattern with oval shell bowls, initialled IS 20-30.32
265.G.K.P., 1937 - a silver golfing prize spoon, inscribed BLGC possibly for Braids Ladies Golf Club. 15 - 20.N/S
269.William Ged, 1712, assay- master Edward Penman - a rare Queen Anne large hash spoon, Hanoverian pattern, with oval rat-tail bowl, engraved with contemporary betrothed initials T? over IL, four slightly rubbed bottom marks, length 39.5cm 700 - 1,000.650
270.Matthew Craw, 1797 - a tablespoon, Old English pattern, initialled LW. 30 - 40.30
271.Robert Spiers (possibly), 1820 - a matched set of six teaspoons, fiddle pattern, initialled BS, three spoons with retailers mark of J & W Marshall, in a fitted case. 40-60.60
272.J. McKay, 1823 - a pair of fiddle pattern sugar tongs with oval shell bowls; also a fiddle pattern teaspoon by Mackay & Chisholm, 1835, and another by PW, Glasgow 1856. 20-25.36
273.J. McKay, c. 1825 - a whisky label, shaped oval with shell and scroll borders (maker's mark JMc only). 60 - 80.N/S
274.Alex Spence, 1813 - a pair of salad servers, pointed-end pattern with shaped blade and tines, initialled T in script. 300 - 350.380
275.II? or IL, 1779? - an Old English/Hanoverian transitional tablespoon, initialled and engraved crest and motto of McLean (four slightly "squashed" bottom marks). 250 - 300.N/S
276.J. McKay, 1849 - a fine quality fiddle pattern soup ladle of heavy gauge, engraved with the crest of Jeffrey (the sun in it's splendour rising out of a cloud). 250 - 350.N/S
277.Fairgrieve & Laws, 1825 - a set of six large tablespoons, fiddle pattern, initialled L.150 - 200N/S
278.Robert Spiers, 1819 - a set of six fiddle pattern tablespoons, maker's mark RS and with retailer's mark of J & W Marshall. 150 - 200.N/S
279.Fairgrieve & Laws, 1824 - a set of twelve large tablespoons, fiddle pattern, initialled L. 300-350.N/S
280.P (unidentified), 1834 - a set of twelve fiddle pattern dessert spoons, initialled L. 300 - 350N/S
281.Lindsay Beech of Glasgow, 1806 - a pair of large toddy ladles, fiddle pattern, initialled K and numbered 5 and 6 140 -160N/S
282.Mackay & Chisholm, 1858 - unusual toddy ladle with part- spiral stem and Madonna and Child finial, circular bowl chased with foliage. 60 - 80.65
283.P (unidentified), 1834 - a set of six fiddle pattern dessert spoons. 150 - 200.N/S
284.Jas. Howden & Co, 1838 - a pair of fiddle pattern toddy ladles. 150 -180N/S
285.Robert Spiers, 1820 -a fiddle pattern toddy ladle, maker's mark RS and retailer's mark of J & W Marshall. 80 -100.N/S
286.Adam Elder, 1829 - a pair of oar pattern toddy ladles, maker's mark AE and retailer's mark of J & W Marshall. 150 - 180.N/S
287.Adam Elder, 1829 - a pair of oar pattern toddy ladles ensuite with the preceding. 150 - 180N/S
288.Adam Elder, 1829 - a pair of oar pattern toddy ladles ensuite with the preceding. 150 -180N/S
289.Jas. Howden & Co, 1838 - a fiddle pattern toddy ladle. 70 - 90.N/S
290.Jas. Howden & Co, 1838- a set of six fiddle pattern dessert spoons. 150 - 180N/S
291.Daniel McLean, 1821 - a pair of fiddle pattern toddy ladles, maker's mark DMcL and retailer's mark of J & W Marshall. 150 - 180.N/S
294.Brook & Son, 1924 - a Traprain treasure reproduction of a Roman silver ladle with deep circular bowl and dolphin handle. 70 - 90.150
297.James Gilsland, c. 1770 - an unusual Hanoverian pattern sauce ladle of heavy gauge, engraved with lion crest (three bottom marks). 150 - 200.150
298.W & P Cunningham, c.1800 - two pointed-end teaspoons. 10 - 20.N/S
299.J. McKay, 1818 - a soup ladle of fiddle and shell pattern with oval bowl. 180 - 250.N/S

Elgin

300.Joseph Pozzi and Robert Stewart, c. 1840 - a teaspoon, fiddle pattern (four marks - J; P; ELN; RS). 80 -120.85
301.Thomas Stewart, c. 1815 - a dessert spoon, Old English pattern (two boldly punched marks - TS; ELN). 80 -120.80
302.Thomas Stewart, c. 1815 - a dessert spoon, Old English pattern, ensuite with the preceding. 80-120.N/S
303.Charles Fowler, c. 1810 - a tablespoon, Old English pattern, initialled S (three marks - CF; ELGIN; B). 70 -100.125
304.Thomas Stewart, c. 1815 - an unusual masking spoon, oar pat- tern with ovoid bowl and part-spiral stem, initialled TH over B (two marks - TS; ELN). 70 -100110
305.Charles Fowler, c. 1810 - a table fork, fiddle pattern, engraved crest and motto of Brodie (three marks - CF; ELGIN; F). 80-100.100

Fochabers
307.J McI (possibly Fochabers), c. 1830 - a teaspoon, fiddle pattern, indistinct initial (three marks - JMcI: ?: thistle). 60 - 80.50

Forres
    
308.John & Patrick Riach, c. 1825 - a fine and rare tablespoon, fiddle pattern, initialled GS (three marks - tower; IPR; tower). 1,000 - 1,500. "This tablespoon was in excellent condition with clear marks. It was bought in at 800".N/S
309.John & Patrick Riach, c. 1825 - a fine and rare basting spoon, fiddle pattern (three marks - tower; IPR; tower), length 29.5cm. 1,200 - 1,800. "A rare basting spoon which unfortunately had an inscription erased. It did not sell at a hammer price of 750".N/S

Glasgow

310.Taylor & Hamilton, c. 1780 - a tablespoon, Hanoverian pattern, engraved with demi-lion rampant crest (three marks - T&H; Glasgow town mark; T&H). 70 - 100.90
311.W.M. (probably Glasgow), c. 1785 - a tablespoon, Old English pattern with ridge to reverse of stem, initialled B (four bottom marks - WM; S; WM; S). 40-60.75
312.Robert Gray, c. 1780 - a tablespoon, Hanoverian pattern, initialled K (three bottom marks - RG; Glasgow town mark; RG). 70-100.80
313.Peter Aitken, 1843 - a pair of toddy ladles, fiddle pattern, initialled IMK. 80 -120.85
314.Peter Aitken, 1843 - a pair of toddy ladles, ensuite with the preceding. 80 -120.80
316.John Todd, 1823 - a set of six teaspoons of single struck Queen's Honeysuckle pattern, initialled IS. 45 - 60.60
317.Milne & Campbell, c. 1770 - a pair of sugar tongs of typical Scottish pattern, with scallop-shaped bowls (two marks - M&C twice) (split to bow). 10 - 15.14
319.Milne & Campbell, c.l770-a punch ladle with turned wood stem and plain circular bowl (maker's mark M&C only) 140 - 160.N/S
320.WH, 1823 - a large toddy ladle, fiddle pattern, initialled Sand numbered 3. 70 - 90.N/S
321.Taylor & Hamilton, c.1780 - a Scot's fiddle pattern teaspoon, initialled MN, another by Adam Graham; another by WT; and three others, similar. (6) 180 - 200.N/S
322.William Coghill, 1874 - three fiddle pattern teaspoons, initialled AM. 20 - 30N/S
323.Adam Graham, c. 1765 - a fine Hanoverian pattern tablespoon with engraved coat of arms (three bottom marks - AG; Glasgow town - mark; AG). 150- 200.130

Greenock
    
324.Alex Campbell (possibly), c. 1810 - a pair of sugar tongs, Old English pattern with shell bowls (three marks - AC; anchor; oak tree). 50 - 70.60
325.Thomas Davie, c. 1800 - a large tablespoon, Old English pointed-end pattern, initialled RGK (five marks - TD; anchor; sailing ship; c; oak tree) (minor dinks to the bowl). 120 -160.100
326.James Orr, c. 1815 - a large tablespoon, Old English pattern, initialled McC (four marks - 10; G; oak tree; anchor). Although the first recorded mention for James Orr is c. 1815, this spoon would appear to date from c. 1795 60 - 80.55
327.John Heron, c. 1810 - a fine quality soup ladle of heavy gauge fiddle pattern with circular bowl (five marks - 1H script; anchor; sailing ship; 0; oak tree). 500 - 700.N/S
329.John Heron, 1836 - a toddy ladle, fiddle pattern, initialled S (five marks - J. HERON; and four Glasgow marks). 180 - 200.N/S
330.Thomas Davie, c. 1800 - a teaspoon, Old English pattern (three marks - TD; anchor; oak tree). 40 - 50N/S
331.Alexander Campbell (possibly), c. 1810 - a set of six large tablespoons, fiddle pattern, initialled AC over I (four marks - AC; oak tree; G; anchor). 500 - 600.N/S
332.CM, unascribed, C. 1810 - a large fiddle pattern tablespoon with traces of engraved initials (four marks - CM; anchor; W; oak tree). 80 -100.N/S
333.Alexander Campbell (possibly), c. 1800 - a large tablespoon, Old English pattern, initialled IB (four marks - AC; oak tree; G; anchor) 80 - 100.N/S
334.William Clark (possibly), c. 1800 - a large pointed-end table- spoon with pointed bowl (five marks - WC; anchor; sailing ship; C; oak tree). 200 - 220.N/S
335.William Clark (possibly), c. 1800 - a large tablespoon ensuite with the preceding. 200-220.N/S

Inverness
337.Charles Jameson - a table- spoon, Old English pattern, initialled DKA (four marks - CJ; INS; camel; CJ on it's side). 150 - 200.120
338.Alexander Stewart, C. 1810 - a dessert spoon, Old English pattern with pointed bowl, initialled M (two marks - AS; INS). 120 - 150.125
339.Donald Fraser, 1830 (possibly Wick) - a mustard spoon, single struck King's pattern, initialled L (six marks - DF; W?; four Edinburgh marks). These marks pose a few questions. The DF punch is clearly that of Donald Fraser, but it is partially overstruck with a W-possibly intended for retail in Wick? The spoon is of "Edinburgh" type and was most probably bought-in by Fraser from an Edinburgh silversmith and then punched with the DF and W marks. See Moss & Roe Highland Gold and Silversmiths pages 50 & 178. 80 - 120.80
340.Alexander Stewart, c. 1810 - a sugar or preserve spoon, fiddle pat- tern with part-spiral stem, initialled GCG (three marks - AS; INS; S). 180 - 250. "There was a lot of interest in this spoon. I marked it down as thin and having possibly a repaired stem. It surprised when it went for an over estimate price of 300".300
341.Donald Fraser,1830 - a fiddIe pattern toddy ladle, initialled W (five marks - DF and four Edinburgh marks). 40 - 50.55
342.Jameson & Naughten, c. 1815 - a teaspoon, oar pattern, initialled DMC (three marks - J&N; INS; cornucopia). 50 - 70.75
343.Donald Fraser, c. 1815 - a tablespoon, Old English pattern with traces of an engraved crest and motto "Esse Quam Videri" (To be, rather than to seem) (one mark - DF over INS) (old repair at junction of stem and bowl). 50 - 70.N/S
344.Robert Naughten, c. 1820 - a fine pair of large sauce ladles, oar pattern with oval bowls (three boldly struck marks - RN; cornucopia; thistle) (10;10). Robert Naughten's marks are often lightly or poorly struck - perhaps his punches were not renewed as often as they might have been. The hallmarks on these ladles are crisp and clear and an excellent example of Naught en's marks. 500 - 700. "A fine pair of sauce ladles which unfortunately, like many spoons in this sale, would appear to have had an inscription erased".620

Montrose
353.Thomas Johnston, C.1750 - a rare tablespoon, Hanoverian pattern, initialled P (three bottom marks - TI; rose; B). 120 -180.100
354.William Mill, c. 1810 - two teaspoons, Old English pattern, initialled IF (five marks - WM thrice; rose twice), (old repair to bowl). (2) 40 - 60.75
355.William Mill (probably), c. 1815 - a punch ladle with baleen spiral stem and plain oval bowl, initialled EP (maker's mark WM only). 160 - 180.N/S
356.John Glenny (probably), c. 1820 - a set of five teaspoons, oar pattern, initialled A (four marks - hammer; rose; IG script; IG - four spoons marked thus, the other with- out hammer mark). 150 - 200.200

Perth
359.James Wright, c. 1795 - a pair of sugar tongs of Scottish type with shaped arms and circular bowls, initialled MW (three marks - JW; double-headed eagle; S). There has been much debate about this set of marks, stylistically; the form would suggest a West of Scotland origin. 50 - 80.95
360.James Cornfute, c. 1775 - a tablespoon, Hanoverian pattern with pronounced ridge to stem, initialled K (four marks - IC twice, double-headed eagle twice). 80 - 120.100
361.Robert Keay, c. 1820 - a : dessert spoon, fiddle pattern, initialled ( T (five marks - RK thrice; double- headed eagle twice). 25 - 40.26
362.Robert Keay, c. 1820 - a fiddle pattern tablespoon, initialled W (five marks - RK thrice; eagle twice). 80 -100.N/S
363.James Wright, c. 1800 - an Old English pattern teaspoon, initialled I (four marks - JW; tree; S; eagle). 25 - 30.28
364.James Wright, c. 1800 - a teaspoon ensuite with the preceding. 20 - 25.N/S

Peterhead
366.George Angus, c. 1820 - a rare teaspoon, Old English pattern, initialled GIP (three marks -GA; PHD; GA). 1,000 -1,500. "Selling for a below estimate price of 880 may be because of what I noted as 'slight ware to the bowl' and the marks being worn".880

Tain
367.Alexander Stewart, c. 1820 - a fine and rare tablespoon, fiddle pat- tern with pointed bowl and chamfered stem (three marks - AS; TAIN; C). 1,000 -1,500. "Another spoon having apparently had an inscription erased. Apart from that it was in good overall condition. Unfortunately it did not find a buyer, being bought in at 800".N/S
368.Hugh Ross, c. 1760 - an extremely rare silver masking spoon with oval bowl, tapering stem and double drop heel, the finial formed as a pointed scrolled "wing" motif (maker's mark only - HR conjoined). There is evidence of a slightly poor finish to the reverse of the upper stem. This may have resulted from the silversmith's difficulty in executing a stem of this length and narrowness. 1,000 - 1,500. "Much debate was had about this masking spoon. I would suggest that it was like no other from the north east of Scotland. From the tip of the bowl to halfway up the stem, including the HR conjoined hallmark, I would suggest appeared correct. However, from there to the top of the 'finial' created a lot of discussion. The 'roughness' of the back top part of the stem did pose questions. Also the unusual pointed scrolled 'wing' motif finial was far more ornate than one would expect on this type of spoon from the north east of Scotland. There must have been enough doubt in prospective bidders minds, as this spoon did not sell, being bought in at 700".N/S

Conclusion:-
Members will have noted that on many occasions I state that 'an inscription has been erased'. To me, when this is done it takes a lot of the history away from an item of silver, particularly if a crest and motto has been removed. I trust that no true collector would ever consider doing this to any spoon. Where do we go from here? With, as I said earlier, approximately 40% of items apparently not selling and very few selling for over estimate prices, I feel we may well be in the 'doldrums'. Are reserves to high or is it a lack of buying power in this period of financial instability. Let us hope that there is an upturn soon and that we see, once again, a steady growth in the market.

Thomson Roddick & Medcalf's next sale will be held on Tuesday 25th March 2003 at the Royal Ettrick Hotel, Edinburgh.

-o-o-o-o-o-o-

.28. / .29. / .30. / .31.
The Finial, February/March 2003


This site and images copyright © 1997-2003, by Daniel Bexfield Antiques